Black Mass: A Hot Mess

It’s been a poor year for gangster cinema – Cell Magazine‘s Laurence Langan writes for Hollywood Hegemony on why Johnny Depp’s latest vehicle, Black Mass, does little to buck that trend.

ffffff

FFFFFFFFU-

You’re in the pub. Everyone’s talking. Politics, T.V or general gossip, it doesn’t matter. You’re having a good old gab. You jump in to the conversation with a flourish, monologuing passionately about the way the world is. Cement solid points and clever informed witticisms flow forth. Then, as you go on, you sort of lose track of what you’re saying. First you’re generalising. Now you’re quoting something out of context.  Then you’re just plain making something up. Soon, you trail off and mutter a sort of open ended, vacuous moral and quickly pretend you need to go and use the facilities. Exit stage left.

This kind of social awkwardness is what watching Black Mass is a bit like. A muddled, pointless ramble with zero self-awareness.  Continue reading

Norwich Radical Film Festival Launches

With the first Norwich Radical Film Festival scheduled for August 2015, the campaign to build a vibrant and varied platform for alternative radical politics began in earnest last month, with the first in what will be a monthly series of screenings.
Guillermo del Toro’s The Devil’s Backbone was screened to a full-house at Take 5’s Crypt in Norwich – and was brilliantly prefaced by festival Events Organiser and Spanish horror academic Irene Cuder (who you may recognise from our documentary film Witches and Bitches last year). The full introduction can be seen in the film below. If you like what you see, the next screening will be of Waltz with Bashir, on November 18th, 7pm at the Assembly House in Norwich. 

“Not on my watch”: Doctor Who shows us how to really treat Remembrance Day

On the 11th of November, as we remember those who have died in wars past and present, it is important that we learn the lessons of our painful history, and say never again. While news and television coverage of Remembrance Day seems to have long forgotten this though, helping re-purpose a ceremony that now sees wreaths laid to sanctify war, rather than to end it – there was still someone who took a stand for peace. The Doctor.

Continue reading