“White Man eats the body of Jesus Christ every Sunday”: Ravenous and the New Age Wendigo

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Let’s be real; in every way imaginable this weekend is Crap Christmas. Easter is the Justice League to Christmas’ Avengers – it has the same tedious check-list, just with fewer frills. Inevitably, along with the inevitable chocolate binge, this means each year we re-run debates on “the true meaning” of Easter. 2017, like every year, has featured the usual assortment of adorable videos of 3 year olds humorously critiquing the logistics of rabbits that lay eggs, as well as the usual tedious, forced stand-up routine from that friend, about whether someone who is resurrected is necessarily a zombie (sorry fella, Cyanide and Happiness outflanked you on that by a good decade); but of course while you might get some entertainment out of these finicky points of pedantry, they completely ignore the ideological undercurrent of the festival in its modern form. That’s why this Easter Sunday, we’re taking a look back at a forgotten work of savage satire; Antonia Bird’s Ravenous (1999). Continue reading

More things in Heaven and Earth: A belated review of ‘Whistle and I will come to you’

Traditionally, ghosts are usually the anonymised remnants of souls who perished unjustly – who return, damaged and riled by the experience, to extol revenge from the living. They are the people who die in pain, misery and poverty, having been hounded to their graves – even in the modern day – by elites who see nothing monstrous in that – only normality. Elites who overthrow their own reason by refusing to acknowledge those forces inside themselves which they simply cannot understand – and who subsequently cannot foresee a backlash to their actions. And that’s why ghost stories like Whistle and I’ll Come to You are ever so essential ingredients to Christmas tradition – as a warning to those ‘more fortunate’.

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“There are more things in heaven and earth than are dreamt of in your philosophy…”

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Jimmy Snuka and Misogyny in Wrestling

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In light of the charges brought against Jimmy Snuka, Adam Hofmeister examines the history of misogyny in professional wrestling.

TW: graphic descriptions of violence against women, rape, domestic violence.

2015 has been a very rough year for WWE. Dusty Rhodes and “Rowdy” Roddy Piper have vaulted off of the mortal springboard, Daniel Bryan has retired due to being physically broken in 3.5 million places and, most infamously, Hulk Hogan, the very face of wrestling itself, has been unceremoniously fired from the company for racist comments he made in (of all places) a sex tape back in 2007. Continue reading

What’s your favourite scary movie: In defence of Scream, in rememberance of Wes Craven

Today, Hollywood’s horror scene lost a member of its royalty, with the passing of Wes Craven. While there is a good deal of idealistic memorialising no doubt going regarding his career – which let’s be fair, was as filled with flops as it was with shocks – I feel the need instead to leap to defense to one of his most maligned successes; Scream (1996). While Scream’s legacy was, as was the case with the bulk of Craven’s hits, hindered by a string of less effective sequels, and while it arrived on screens very much toward the end of the ‘slasher picture’ rising star, in a box-office lull where horror looked destined for the bargain-bin, to my mind its genre-savvy social commentary and cutting social critiques make it the very apex of its cinematic genome.

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Why The Long Face? BoJack Horseman and Depression

Adam Hofmeister takes a personal look at the bizarre yet poignant world of Netflix cartoon BoJack Horseman, and what it has to say to those who may find themselves wandering into it.

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“You know, sometimes I feel like I was born with a leak, and any goodness I started with just slowly spilled out of me, and now it’s all gone. And I’ll never get it back in me. It’s too late. Life is a series of closing doors, isn’t it?”
– BoJack Horseman, Horse Majeure Continue reading

A Seismic Shift – the ideology of survival in San Andreas

For years, one of the greatest forces in the box-office at summer time has been the force of nature itself. Now, Jack Brindelli explores the shifting reflections of elitist ideology in the genre’s latest smash-hit San Andreas (2015).

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Even earthquakes don’t move The Rock.

For decades, artistic imaginings of the apocalypse, and humanity’s relationship to it have dominated summer cinema. Whilst the genre might be much maligned as being overly simplistic, unimaginative, and light on story, the disaster epic is often a signifier for the Hollywood elite’s perception of sea-changes in the global political climate. On the geo-political level, we can see this point emphasised by the career of Roland Emmerich – who continues to exemplify the genre with Independence Day 2 due next year – as the response to each crisis morphs along with popular preconceptions about US hegemony. Continue reading

“As God As My Witness, He’s Broken in Half!” or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Wrestling

Is there more to professional wrestling than perhaps we think? Recent convert and Macho Madness Syndrome sufferer Adam Hofmeister gives us his thoughts on the joy of staged violence and whether it deserves its low status.

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It is impossible to deny that violence is a fundamental part of human existence. Every culture has been formed on it and attempted to understand and represent it via artistic expression, whether it’s through the horrific paintings of Goya, the bloody plays of William Shakespeare, or any of the depictions of scenes from the Bible. But enough about all that angsty, teenage nonsense; I’m going to talk about wrestling. Continue reading