The Witch of Your Mother – The Spanish Coven

To celebrate Halloween, Hollywood Hegemony proudly presents horror academic Irene Cuder’s thought provoking essay regarding the role of witches in demonising female empowerment. 

                    Irene also features in our final Horror Cuts film “Witching and Bitching”

As Creed states, “there is one incontestably monstrous role in the horror film that belongs

to woman – that of the witch” (Creed, 1993, p. 73). The film Witching and Bitching,

aka Las Brujas de Zugarramurdi (de la Iglesia, 2013) offers a good example of a filmic

representation of male tension towards female empowerment by introducing a recently

divorced father who abducts his son and perpetrates a robbery and in her attempt to leave

Spain to start a new life with his son, he encounters an evil coven. Continue reading

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Check out the Women’s Film and Television History blog

My review of The Song of the Shirt (1970) and many other interesting reads await on the Women’s Film and Television History blog, which you can visit here (or by clicking the sample text to my review below). It’s a site well worth a look for a more academic exploration of cinema and gender.

The Song of the Shirt poster

At first glance, The Song of the Shirt (Clayton and Curling, 1979) is hard to enjoy. The opening consists of migraine-inducing overlapping texts; squawking free-form clarinets, and jumbled quick-fire quotes. It seems initially that this attempt to deconstruct the grand narratives of liberal history, and reform the component parts into a radical critique, lacks any kind of structural coherence. However, it soon emerges that this is actually a brilliant foreshadowing of the structure of the film. Eventually, out of the chaos comes a brilliantly orchestrated profundity...”